Bridge

   

Where art and science collide in the fluid stream of human consciousness, gods and demons are taxonomically categorized and the unruly assumptions of objective reason are set free.
A couple of years after arriving here in Hawaii I was invited to exhibit at the Honolulu Museum. Emotionally, I was still half way between the language I’d used for my work in Los Angeles, and the language I was developing here. While I was moving forward with new improvisational work, the exhibition was an opportunity for a personal retrospective. Bridge was a last homage to my time in L.A.
It was modeled after a Roman arch, the form potters still use for kiln roofs. Each vessel was a “brick” – an element within an entirety. I thought of the arch form as a model of social structure. Within a society all elements might be equally relevant, but individuals are not positioned equally.
Each vessel in Bridge is an identical form, however depending upon where each is placed within the structure they are more or less easily read. The vessels at the top tend to make more cognitive sense individually, while the ones at the bottom may appear incoherent.
The piece has stood in my garden for a decade of rain, sun, even hurricanes. Like society, there’s nothing holding it up.